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Does Students’ Sleep Suffer

October 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Uncategorized

Student SleepBy Nilong Vyas, MD

Students have so much on their plates these days and a lot more distractions that keep them occupied. So what is the thing that gets put on the back burner after school work, social ‘work’ and social media? SLEEP!! They ‘borrow’ from sleep to ‘pay’ the fun things in their lives. Plus, because they are off at college, they no longer have the nagging effects of their parent’s voices saying, ‘GO TO BED!!”.

There is plenty of research showing the importance of good sleep and sleep hygiene and a direct negative relation to bad habits in these areas and their grades. Without adequate sleep, not only are their grades affected and thus potential future success but it also affects their long-term (and short-term memory), their physical health and wellbeing as well as their ability to concentrate and focus.

Now that they are adults, whatever habits they create now since they are self-sufficient, they will keep through adulthood. In order to avoid the need for sleep aids in their 40’s, it’s best to establish those good sleep habits now.

Since students were used to having someone dictate when they have to go to sleep, now in college, it is imperative for them to figure to how to force those parameters onto themselves. They must make sleep a priority. One way to do this is to set timers for themselves (on their smart devices) that remind them when it should be time to wind down and start thinking about sleep. They can set a timer to remind them they have 20 min or so to finish up whatever they are working on. Then another timer to get themselves ready for bed (self-care—brushing teeth and washing face, changing into PJs, etc). And another timer for when they should get into bed and be trying to fall asleep (after reading a book, etc). They should have all electronic devices on night mode at this point (at the first timer) so as not to disturb their overnight sleep waves and hormones.

Putting this regimen into practice will allow them to improve their sleep quality and duration and allow them to be more efficient as well as earn better grades and be potentially more successful in life. #winning.

 

About the author: Dr. Vyas is a mom of two children and the founder and owner of Sleepless in NOLA sleep consulting, in New Orleans, LA.

Family Fun and the City

July 4, 2018 by  
Filed under Uncategorized

Michele Fisher

Planning a family vacation this summer? Just because you’re traveling with kids doesn’t mean that your destination has to be a theme park. For a vacation that everyone in the family can enjoy (and that just might be educational, too!), consider a trip to one of our country’s amazing cities.

Cities offer a huge variety of activities for every member of the family, so chances are your biggest problem won’t be finding something to do, but figuring out how to fit in everything you want to do in the time you have. Here are some things to consider:

History. If you’re traveling to Philadelphia, for example, you’ll want to explore the city’s colonial history and role in the American Revolution. Check out Independence Hall, where America’s Founding Fathers signed the Declaration of Independence. And don’t forget a visit to see the Liberty Bell or a stop at Betsy Ross’s home. Each American city has a unique history and story to tell, and most museums these days offer interactive, kid-friendly exhibits that will keep your children engaged and excited.

Hands-on fun. Just because you’re surrounded by sidewalks doesn’t mean your family can’t get outside for some fun combined with fitness. Many cities offer guided bike tours that will introduce you to sites you might have otherwise missed. Or, if you’re in Chicago, for example, you can rent Segways for your family and take a unique spin around the city. And speaking of Chicago, you can combine exercise and sightseeing by rollerblading—or walking or jogging—on the Lakefront Trail, which offers amazing views of Lake Michigan. Most cities have similar trail and park systems.

Food! If you really want to discover the “flavor” of a city, try its most famous cuisine. In Philly? You gotta have a soft pretzel and a cheesesteak. Chicago? It’s deep dish pizza time! Visiting Cincinnati? Try their own style of chili (served over spaghetti). Dallas? Hit the BBQ and queso. Boston? Try some of their iconic clam chowder and lobster. Okay, you get the picture. And I’m getting hungry.…

Tourist destinations. Sure, they’ll be crowded. And yes, they might be expensive. But they’re called destinations for a reason: Some city attractions offer such a unique experience that the memories your kids will take away from them are worth the hassle and expense. If you’re in Chicago, your trip won’t be complete without a spin on the Centennial Wheel and a visit to the Sky Deck of the Willis Tower. Going to NYC? Of course you need to see the Statue of Liberty and maybe take in a show on Broadway (depending on your kids’ ages). In LA? Get your pictures taken on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and Rodeo Drive, or stroll along Santa Monica Pier. In Seattle? Time to visit the Space Needle and Pike Place Market.

Sports. If your family loves sports, take some time to support the local team. Some stadiums, such as Wrigley Field in Chicago, offer behind-the-scenes daily tours. Then relax and unwind spending an evening taking in a baseball game or soccer match as the sun sets.

About the Author

Michele Fisher is the author of the Come Travel with Me book series, including Come Travel with Me: Philadelphia and Come Travel with Me: Chicago which she was inspired to create by her daughter’s interest in travel and willingness to be adventurous and try new things. Michele is from Chester County, Pennsylvania, where she resides with her husband, son, and daughter. She has worked in financial services for 25 years and travels frequently for her job. Michele loves traveling to new places with her family.

Pack Your Bags – It’s Time for Summer Vacation! The Top 10 Tips for Traveling with Kids

June 20, 2018 by  
Filed under Uncategorized

By Michele Fisher

Summer is finally here, and for many families, that means it’s time for a family vacation! If the thought of traveling with your kids is both exciting and—let’s face it—a little nerve-racking, you’re not alone. But with the following tips, you can have a safe, smooth trip that every member of your family will enjoy.

1. Include your kids in the planning. Children will be more excited about a trip if they know what to expect and get to have a eoay in what they’ll be doing. In the weeks leading up to your vacation, share books and online information about your destination. Let each person in the family choose an activity or specific attraction they’d like to visit during the trip, and then be sure to include each in your itinerary.

2. Break up travel boredom with small surprises. Let’s face it, a long car ride or cramped trip in a plane can get boring for kids (and adults). To fend off the grouchy cries of “Are we there yet?” pack some small, inexpensive surprises in your travel bag. Think small toys, fidget spinners, Thinking Putty, coloring books, word search books, stickers, and more. Then ration out each surprise as boredom hits.

3. Have a plan, but be willing to change it. It’s tempting to try to fit as much as possible into each day of your vacation. But if your kids are feeling grumpy or tired, take a cue from them and slow down. Even a 20-minute ice cream break in the middle of the day or deciding to head back to the hotel for an afternoon nap while the sun is at its hottest could make the difference between cranky kids and happy ones.

4. Let your kids be amateur photographers. Pack a sturdy, child-friendly camera and then allow your kids to snap away at anything that interests them. This encourages them to be more observant, and you just might end up with an amazing pic from a brand-new (knee-high) perspective!

5. Pack plenty of baby wipes. Kids out of diapers? Baby wipes are still a godsend for cleaning off the surface of nearly anything you and your kids are going to touch. And, of course, hand sanitizer is a must-have.

6. Snack smart. Avoid the high prices charged at tourist destinations and pack your own snacks. But choose wisely. To avoid crashes following sugary snacks, choose foods that are high in fiber and protein, but low in sugar. Think whole grain crackers, low-sugar granola bars and (dry) cereal, string cheese, and fresh fruit.

7. Play “Who Gets Home First?” You can pick up postcards at nearly any tourist destination and turn them into a fun and easy game. Have your child choose one, write a short note on the back, and mail it to your home address. Then see if you or the postcard makes it home first!

8. Consider a wearable GPS tracker. Got a kid who tends to wander? GPS trackers come in many different models, from bracelets to watches to small units that you can attach to a child’s belt or shoe.

9. Or go low-tech. You could also simply write your name and phone number on your child’s arm, in case you get separated. For older kids, start teaching them your cell phone number a few weeks before your vacation. Finally, it’s wise to choose a spot at each new attraction you visit where everyone agrees to meet if you get separated.

10. Preserve those memories! When you get back home, no doubt you’ll be busy unpacking, doing laundry, and catching up on work emails. But you don’t want to forget all the amazing things you did as a family on your trip. The solution? Let the kids take care of this task by creating their own scrapbooks filled with souvenirs, photos, ticket stubs, postcards, and more. This is also a great way to keep them busy on a rainy day!

 

About the Author

Michele Fisher is the author of the Come Travel with Me book series, including Come Travel with Me: Philadelphia and Come Travel with Me: Chicago which she was inspired to create by her daughter’s interest in travel and willingness to be adventurous and try new things. Michele is from Chester County, Pennsylvania, where she resides with her husband, son, and daughter. She has worked in financial services for 25 years and travels frequently for her job. Michele loves traveling to new places with her family.

The Rise of Spring Allergies: Fact or Fiction?

June 1, 2018 by  
Filed under Uncategorized

Several factors determine the severity of allergy season

 By Sonal R. Patel, M.D., M.S.

 

The spring 2018 allergy season could be the worst yet, or at least that’s what you might hear. Every year is coined as being the worst for allergy sufferers, but are spring allergies really on the rise?

 

There are many events that can help predict how bothersome the spring allergy season will be.  While it’s true that allergies are on the rise and affecting more Americans than ever, each spring isn’t necessarily worse than the last.

 

According to the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (ACAAI), 23.6 million Americans were diagnosed with hay fever in the last year. The prevalence of allergies is surging upward, with as many as 30 percent of adults and up to 40 percent of children having at least one allergy.

 

Following are factors that influence the severity of allergy season, along with some explanations about why more Americans are being diagnosed with allergies.

 

  • Climate Change: Recent studies have shown that pollen levels have been gradually increasing every year. Part of the reason for this is due to the changing climate. The warmer temperatures and mild winters cause plants to begin producing and releasing pollen earlier, making the spring allergy season longer. Rain can promote plant and pollen growth, while wind accompanying rainfall can stir pollen and mold into the air, heightening symptoms. The climate is not only responsible for making the allergy season longer and symptoms more bothersome, but it may also be partially to blame for the rise in allergy sufferers.

 

  • Priming Effect: A mild winter can trigger an early release of pollen from trees. Once allergy sufferers are exposed to this early pollen, their immune systems are primed to react to the allergens, meaning there will be little relief even if temperatures cool down before spring is in full bloom. This “priming effect” can mean heightened symptoms and a longer sneezing season for sufferers.

 

  • Hygiene Hypothesis: This theory suggests that exposure to bacterial by-products from farm animals, and even dogs, in the first few months of life reduces or delays the onset of allergies and asthma. Scientists theorize that because of the modern emphasis on cleanliness, children’s environments may be “too clean,” which might not allow their immune systems to be challenged and to develop properly. This may, in part, explain the increasing incidence of allergies worldwide in developed countries.

 

  • Allergy: The New Kleenex: Ever hear someone ask for a Kleenex instead of a tissue? Much like some people relate all tissues to Kleenex, many also blame runny noses, sneezing, and itchy eyes on allergies, even if they haven’t been accurately diagnosed. Increased awareness and public education about allergies can make it seem like nearly everyone has an allergy or is getting diagnosed with allergies, but it could be more of a public perception issue than you think.

 

While many allergy sufferers reach for over-the-counter medications to find relief, it’s best to visit a board-certified allergist if you believe you might have an allergy. An allergist can perform proper testing to accurately diagnose and treat your condition so the spring sneezing season doesn’t have to be bothersome.

 

Over-the-counter medications may work for those with mild symptoms, but they can cause a variety of unwanted side effects. For sufferers with persistent symptoms, treatment may include allergy shots, which not only provide symptom relief, but also modify and prevent disease progression.

 

If you think you might be one of the more than 50 million Americans who suffer from allergy and asthma, you can track your symptoms with the free online tool MyNasalAllergyJournal.org.

 

About the Author

Dr. Patel is a mom of twin daughters and a physician who specializes in pediatric/adult allergy and immunology with Adventist Health Physicians Network. She is also coauthor of the forthcoming Mommy MD Guide to Twins, Triplets, and More.

 

 

 

 

Double-Duty Spring Cleaning: Keep Healthy and Tidy

May 25, 2018 by  
Filed under Uncategorized

 

Seasonal ritual can also help ward off allergy and asthma symptoms

 

By Sonal R. Patel, M.D., M.S.

Spring cleaning can be more than a daunting chore for those with allergies and asthma. Dust, pet hair, and cleaning supplies can leave you reaching for the tissues instead of the broom. But according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (ACAAI), spring cleaning can also help you avoid allergy symptoms.

When pollen counts are high outdoors, you may be inclined to stay indoors to try to avoid allergy symptoms. But seasonal allergy symptoms can last all year round for those allergic to indoor allergens.

Relief can sometimes be as simple as knowing how to remove allergens from your home. Here are some useful tips for banishing allergens in your home, and ways to avoid accidentally letting more in.

Remember that a fresh breeze won’t please. At the first sign of balmy temperatures, you might get the urge to open up your windows to bring in fresh scents. But this can also lead to unwanted pollen particles entering your home and making you sneeze long after your spring cleaning is complete. Before you reach for the air fresheners and candles, be aware that chemicals found in these items can spur asthma attacks. Your best choice is to opt for natural aromas from the oven or to try an organic air freshener.

Rub a dub, scrub. Bathrooms, basements, and areas that are tiled can be especially prone to mold. The key to reducing mold is moisture control. Be sure to use bathroom fans and clean up any standing water immediately. Scrub any visible mold from surfaces with detergent and water, and completely dry. You can also help ward off mold by keeping your home’s humidity level below 60 percent and cleaning the gutters regularly.

Love your pets, not their dander. After your family pets have spent many days indoors over the winter, chances are the levels of fur, saliva, and dander might be elevated throughout your home. Remove pet allergens by vacuuming frequently and washing upholstery, including your pet’s bed. Also be sure to keep your pets out of the bedroom at all times to ensure you can sleep symptom-free.

Do a whole-house deep cleaning—in stages, if necessary. Cleaning the entire house from top to bottom may take days. But you can get a head start by changing your air filters every three months and using filters with a MERV rating of 11 or 12. Also be sure to vacuum regularly to get rid of dust mites. Use a cyclonic vacuum, which spins dust and dirt away from the floor, or a vacuum with a HEPA (high-efficiency particulate air) filter. Wash bedding and stuffed animals weekly.

Don’t neglect the great outdoors. As the grass turns green and flowers bud, it’s hard to stay indoors and focus on your spring cleaning routine. Still, it’s best to avoid being outdoors when pollen counts are highest (midday and afternoon hours). When mowing and gardening, be sure to wear gloves and an N95 particulate pollen mask (as rated by the CDC’s National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, or NIOSH), and take your medication before you go outside. Avoid touching your eyes, and be sure to wash your hands, hair, and clothing when you go back indoors.

Even when you reduce the number of allergens in your home, allergy symptoms can still be bothersome. Those with seasonal and perennial allergies should be under the care of a board-certified allergist, who can identify the source of the suffering and develop a treatment plan to eliminate symptoms.

For more information about seasonal allergies and to locate an allergist, visit Dr. Patel’s Allergy Busters or AllergyAndAsthmaRelief.org.

 

About the Author
Dr. Patel is a mom of twin daughters and a physician who specializes in pediatric/adult allergy and immunology with Adventist Health Physicians Network. She is also coauthor of the forthcoming Mommy MD Guide to Twins, Triplets, and More.

So Maybe It’s Not Exactly How You Planned

January 28, 2018 by  
Filed under Julie Davidson

By Julie Davidson

When you’re expecting a baby, you have a million decisions to make. And you probably have a good idea of how you’re gonna raise your child. Ideas are good, but they may change.

Before we had our first child, my husband and I had some ideas on what we would do. We thought we’d like to try cloth diapers. But then I realized someone would have to wash all those diapers. There were services we could hire, but for some reason I decided that wouldn’t work either. I think it might have been recalling my mother freely admitting that she stuck us with pins when attempting to get those cloth diapers on. And I wasn’t sure we could replace the pins with duct tape. Honestly, I’m the world’s worst gift wrapper. I couldn’t help but think how the cloth diapers would look like a wad of material on the baby’s bottom. Just couldn’t do it.

My husband thought it would be a good idea to puree the food for the baby. I looked up the definition of puree online. Here’s what I found: “noun. a thick, moist, smooth-textured form of cooked vegetables, fruits, etc., usually made by pressing the pulp through a sieve or by whipping it in a blender.” That sounded like work. I mean for years I’ve seen these jars of baby food with a cute cheeky baby on the label. Just twist, turn, and serve.

One thing we did decide to do was breastfeed. Finally I could use the girls for what they were created for. I figured it would be simple. The baby would be hungry, and I would feed him from my milk stash. Two steps. Easy.

So add breastfeeding to the list of things that I thought I could easily handle. My son was latching on the wrong way. And latching hard. Within 30 minutes of my first attempt, I had a pain running down my neck from my ear to my collarbone. It wasn’t working, and I felt like a failure.

Relief came seven days after our son was born. My sister-in-law came to help. She’s an ob-gyn nurse practitioner. And a lactation consultant. Score!

When she got to the house, she didn’t even unpack her bags. She was on a mission, and within five minutes she had my son latching on one side. Five minutes later, he was on the other side. I was stunned. These were my boobs, but she was getting them to do their thing. Like clockwork. Every four to five hours, she had that kid nursing. Just like that. To this day I call her the “Nipple Whisperer.”

Stick to what you feel is best for your baby. Ask for help. Beg for help. Call your sister-in-law. If you don’t have one, borrow some one else’s.

Magnesium: The Miracle Mineral

July 14, 2017 by  
Filed under R.McAllister

Woman wit her eyes closed under the wind.

How’s your magnesium level? If you have no idea, you have plenty of company! Magnesium is a mineral that many of us don’t think about—even though it’s an essential mineral that your body needs to function properly.

Truth be told, even if you did know your magnesium level, there’s a good chance it would be too low. Most Americans are deficient in magnesium.

But here’s the good news: If you’re able to get enough magnesium, it can benefit your body in many ways. Magnesium can…

  • Offset the negative effects of stress: Most people suffer from the stress of trying to do too much, too perfectly, and too fast.
  • Soothe the gastrointestinal tract: Magnesium also offers laxative properties.
  • Boost brainpower: This is especially the case in people with memory problems.
  • Increase energy: If your magnesium level is low, your body has to work harder to do even basic tasks, which can make you feel tired. Studies have shown that women with magnesium deficiencies had higher heart rates and required more oxygen to do physical tasks then they did after their magnesium levels were restored to normal.
  • Ease anxiety and/or insomnia: Magnesium helps to promote a sense of calm and can facilitate more restful sleep.
  • Cure a migraine pronto!

The recommended daily intake of magnesium is about 300 milligrams for women and 350 milligrams for men. One way to get more magnesium is to eat a handful of almonds, hazelnuts, or cashews.

Another easy and tasty way is with a supplement called Natural Calm, which has been a best selling supplement for 9 years. It’s a flavorful powder that dissolves easily in water, tea, or other beverages. Natural Calm supports heart health, bone health, better sleep, and natural energy production. It comes in a variety of delicious, organic flavors that are naturally sweetened with organic stevia. It’s also vegan, gluten-free, and non GMO. You can buy Natural Calm online and in health food stores for around $15. Visit NaturalVitality.com/natural-calm for more information.

About the author: Rallie McAllister, MD, MPH, is a family physician and mom of three sons in Lexington, KY. She’s the co-author of the Mommy MD Guide books, including The Mommy MD Guide to Pregnancy and Birth.

No, Formula Doesn’t Need Warming!

June 30, 2017 by  
Filed under J.Reich

Mother Feeding Her Baby ca. October 2000

And 5 other baby formula myths—debunked

By Rallie McAllister, MD, MPH

The MythBusters on TV’s Discovery channel tackled hundreds—if not thousands—of myths in their 19 seasons on the air. If they talked about infant feeding, I must have missed that episode. Yet baby feeding has many pervasive myths—especially about infant formula. Here are five of my favorites.

Myth 1: Breast is best.

Fact: Not for every mother and baby. Baby formulas are a completely acceptable, doctor-approved, and time-tested option when feeding baby. Breastfeeding is hard. It seems like it should be natural easy, but so often it isn’t. A recent study conducted by Perrigo Nutritionals found that more than half of moms experience issues when it comes to breastfeeding baby with low breast milk supply being the top concern. Additionally, while only 18 percent of new moms expect to introduce infant formula to baby during the first three days of life, in reality, 45 percent relied on infant formula during those first days. If you experience breastfeeding challenges, look to formula as an ally – it can be used as a supplement while breastfeeding to provide some relief or used exclusively depending on mom and baby’s needs. Also, know that you can find help and support. Consider talking with a friend who has nursed her babies, your pediatrician, a lactation consultant, or a local La Leche League.

Myth 2: You have to sterilize your baby’s bottles.

Fact: No. This is another time-saver for you! You should sterilize new bottles and nipples before you use them for the first time. Simply put them in boiling water for 5 minutes. After that first time, however, you probably don’t need to sterilize them again.

Instead, you can run bottles and nipples through the dishwasher. Or if you’re “old school,” wash them in hot, soapy water. Rinse them carefully to remove any soap residue.

Myth 3: Babies prefer warm formula.

Fact: Not necessarily. It’s perfectly fine to feed your baby formula at room temperature (as long as it’s freshly prepared), or even a little cool from the refrigerator. Your baby is most likely to prefer his or her formula at a consistent temperature. In other words, if you start warming it you’ll probably have to continue warming it.

Here’s an easy way to warm your baby’s bottle: Set the filled bottle in a container of warm water and let it stand for a few minutes. Check the temperature of the formula on the inside of your wrist before feeding it to your baby. It should feel lukewarm, not hot.

Myth 4: Measuring formula isn’t a big deal—just “eyeball it.”

Fact: The instructions for preparing your baby’s formula are important. Follow the directions on the label carefully. If you put too little water in your baby’s formula, it can give baby dehydration or diarrhea. If you put too much water in the formula, you’re watering it down and your baby isn’t getting enough nutrients. It’s critical to measure carefully each and every time.

Myth 5: Brand name formula is best.

Fact: Nationally advertised, brand-name formula and store brand formula are practically identical—but have different effects on your family budget! Did you know that all infant formulas sold in the United States must meet the same FDA standards and offer complete nutrition for baby? That means store brand formula is nutritionally comparable to nationally advertised brands. In fact, store brand formula is clinically proven to support baby’s growth and development and proven to be just as well tolerated by your baby as those other brands.

So, what’s the main difference? Store brand formula costs less because they don’t spend millions of dollars on marketing – think about all the ads you see on TV and all the samples that get handed out in doctors’ offices.  In the case of those big brands, those marketing costs are passed on to you in the form of a higher price tag on each container of formula.

Once you get into the groove of feeding your baby, it will all feel like second nature. And then it will almost be time to give up the bottle!

About the author: Rallie McAllister, MD, MPH, is a family physician and mom of three sons in Lexington, KY. She’s the co-author of the Mommy MD Guides books, including The Mommy MD Guide to Your Baby’s First Year.

About the survey: Perrigo Nutritionals, the makers of store brand formula, conducted the survey in February of 2017, among 2,000 nationally representative Americans between the ages of 18 and 65 who currently have a child between the ages of one and three.  Margin of error is +/- 3 percent. To learn more about store brand formula or to discover special promotions or offers, visit www.storebrandformula.com.

Total savings with Store Brand Infant Formula calculations based on a price per fl. oz. comparison of Store Brand Infant Formulas and their comparable national brands. Retail prices are from a May 2017 retail price survey of assorted stores. Actual prices and savings may vary by store and location.

 

For a Successful School Year: Get Enough Fluids

September 21, 2016 by  
Filed under Uncategorized

by Mommy MD Guide Ayala Laufer-Cahana, MD

Is the water bottle your constant companion, or are you the type that trusts we can do just fine in between hydration opportunities? Does hydration status really matter all that much?

Clearly, dehydration is an unhealthy, dangerous state. Even mild dehydration – loss of just 2 percent of body weight in water – makes us less alert, affects our well-being, and of course makes us feel thirsty. But going without water for just a few hours hasn’t been studied much up until now.

4 HOURS WITHOUT WATER

A new study, led by David Benton, in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, recruited 101 undergraduate students, aged 18-30 years, and put them in a warm (86 °F, 30 °C) room for 4 hours, during which they performed cognitive tests.

Half the students got a 5oz drink of water 90 and 180 minutes into the experiment.

The students were not aware that what was tested was the effect of hydration on cognition – they were told that the experiment was about the effects of heat. The tests, which were repeated 3 times throughout the 4-hour study, included memory recall quizzes — in which the students were given lists of words, and asked to recall as many as they could remember immediately after, and then again 20 minutes later — attention tests and subjective mood scores.

Students that didn’t drink water forgot more words in both the immediate and delayed memory recall test, and had poorer attention scores. The students who got some water also reported less anxiety at the end of the test.

The 26 men and 24 women who had no water for 4 hours lost on average 0.72 percent body weight, but at 90 minutes into the experiment the participants lost just 0.22 percent body weight, which is very little. Nevertheless, memory was already affected.

IS YOUR KID DRINKING ENOUGH WATER AT SCHOOL?

This experiment suggests that even small changes in hydration can make a difference. Mood and alertness are the first to be affected when our body needs food and drink, and while mild changes in body fluids certainly don’t put us in danger of dropping blood pressure or shutting off our kidneys, proper hydration can help a student to perform at his best. Kids also lose a larger proportion of their water due to their smaller size and higher activity levels. The authors cite a few studies that prove that as a first-grader, a drink can help you think, and that 7-9 year olds that got an additional drinkperformed better on visual attention tasks.

As the school year starts, giving kids access to good drinking water, and reminding them to take that drink is a really simple way to make sure studying’s a little bit easier and happier. Hydration affects mood and if we can buy a little peace of mind with a glass of water lets do it.

By federal law, free drinking water has to be available to students during school meals. In between, kids should have access to plain water throughput the day, but policies change state-to-state and district-to-district.

Does your school have functioning water fountains? Unfortunately, due to old pipessome school fountains have been found to dispense water with unsafe lead levels.

So, as the school and academic year commence, encourage kids to pay attention to hydration, check that they have access to water that has been tested, and set an example by drinking enough yourself.

To a happy and healthy school year!

Dr. Ayala

Signs Your Child May Need “Sleep Training” {aka Parent Training}

August 14, 2016 by  
Filed under Uncategorized

by Mommy MD Guide Nilong Parikh Vyas, MD, MPH

Signs Your Child May Need Sleep Training: A Pediatrician’s Tale

Having a baby was one of the most wonderful, emotionally satisfying and beautiful things that has ever happened to me. After the initial exhilaration wore off and we finally got to take our bundle of joy home, it suddenly hit us: now what do we do? The reality was that – as amazing as it all was – I had no idea what to do. Combine that with the exhaustion from lack of sleep and, well, it was a bit overwhelming. Then came all the well intended advice from friends and family…

“You will be so exhausted but because you love your baby so much, you’ll somehow get through it.”

“You will want to hold that baby in your arms all day, everyday, and never put him down,”

“It’s the best thing that has ever happened to you so just deal with all the hard stuff!”

“You can sleep, shower and eat – when the baby sleeps.”

Granted, some of those things turned out to be true, but for me it was hard. Really, REALLY hard. I was not just physically exhausted but emotionally as well. I loved this baby; I really wanted this baby. I wanted to spend every waking moment with this baby, but wait … did I really? I was beyond tired, and it proved to be much more difficult than I expected. I thought that I was well-qualified for motherhood because I had loved (and was good at) all my baby-sitting jobs growing up. Moreover, I was a trained pediatrician. But I quickly realized that neither the universe nor pediatric residency prepared me for the hardest job of them all: motherhood.

My bundle of joy was 4 months old, super cranky and so was the rest of my family. He was cranky when I held him and even crankier when I put him down. He would fall asleep in my arms, but as soon as I would put him down, he would wake up, cry, and the process would start all over again. I would get him to sleep, walk out of the room, the floorboards would creak and he would be up again. Repeat. Repeat. Repeat. They say that the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.

I had to do something for the sake of my child and my own sanity…

The Solution: Sleep Training (aka Parent Training)

The one common thread through all the books I read on the topic of sleep was that I needed to follow my baby’s cues and let him guide me (instead of the other way around). I had to figure out what he was trying to tell me that I couldn’t hear, couldn’t judge or wasn’t listening to properly. As I watched him more closely, I noticed a pattern emerging. I monitored his sleep cues, as well as his hunger cues, trying my best not to confuse the two. I noticed that when I followed his sleepy cues, he would sleep. When I followed his hunger cues (and fed him only when I saw those), he ate better, which led him to sleep better, which led him to be happier. A less cranky baby led to a less cranky mommy. Common sense, right? But oh so hard to decipher when you’re in the thick of infant sleep deprivation, adjusting to motherhood and possibly returning to work on top of it all.

As I made this change, my son’s sleep cycles and feeding cycles became more predictable and so did my own life. Granted, I had many friends and family that told me they were “anti-schedule.” They said things like, “let the baby decide when he’s hungry and sleepy, and do not put him on a schedule. Let him sleep when he wants to and feed when he wants to.” Was putting him on a “schedule” going against nature and doing something wrong for my baby?

I soon realized that I was indeed following nature (my baby’s cues), and a schedule was emerging on its own, with only a minimal amount of input from me. This wasn’t MY schedule; it was my baby’s schedule. Then, I knew with confidence that I was doing the right thing. Not only did I notice a palpable increase in both mine and my baby’s overall happiness, I also noticed significant jumps in his development. I had the baby that everyone noted “you are so lucky to have such a sweet, happy and alert baby. He is so easy but wait until you have the next one!” Well, guess what? I did have that next one, and I put the same principles into play. And what do you know? I got really lucky. TWICE!!

Note to all: luck had nothing to do with it!

So What Is Involved With Sleep Training?

Many people think that sleep training is harmful to your child, that it involves leaving your child to cry for hours on end and that it’s akin to cruel and unusual punishment. What terrible parent would have a baby just to torment that child into fitting into their lifestyle and schedule? NO ONE!!

Sleep training is not the best term. It should more appropriately be called sleep adjustment, sleep tolerance, sleep associations, or my personal favorite: Parent Training. Just call it anything BUT sleep training. Parent training means that you are training yourself, as a parent, to learn what the baby is trying to tell you. In fact, you don’t have to do any of the hard work: just figure out your baby’s cues, and they will lead you. If you do that, the rest is easy and falls into place. It’s a matter of assessing his/her needs and putting in the necessary steps to fulfill those needs. In the process, he learns to soothe himself. You have to establish routine and consistency, and everyone can at least agree that a child needs that to grow and meet their milestones to reach their full potential.

If a child is not well-rested, it can lead to numerous problems throughout his lifetime. In the short term, sleep deprived children can be slow to meet developmental milestones. Of course kids will ultimately learn to walk, talk, read and write, but it’s more likely to happen readily and without much challenge if the child has had adequate sleep. A well-rested child is emotionally stable, more capable of dealing with the world around her and more willingly redirected. Lastly,a well-rested child yields a well-rested adult, which in turn allows you to be at your best when interacting with your child.

So how do you know if your family may benefit from parent training?

What Are the Symptoms of Sleep Deprivation?

  • Your child usually cries when you put them down to sleep
  • You have to lay with your baby for them to fall asleep
  • Your child falls asleep every time they are in the car
  • She is difficult to soothe and put to sleep
  • She is a perpetual ‘catnapper’
  • Multiple things have to be done to get her to sleep including continuous rocking, feeding, bouncing, walking, etc
  • Your child will fall asleep when you are holding her and wake moments after she is put down, even when you thought she was ‘fast asleep’
  • She cries even when you are rocking her
  • She takes longer and longer to fall asleep in your arms. This is mostly because children get distrustful when they fall asleep one place and wake up in another. Imagine if you fell asleep on the sofa and ended up in your bed – it would be very confusing for you! For the child, falling asleep in your arms then waking in their crib is more than a little disconcerting
  • If your child has been deemed ‘very active, hyper, can’t stop, always on the go, and doesn’t need much sleep’. Hint: ALL children need sleep and plenty of it

If you said yes to any of the above statements, it’s likely that your child suffers from sleep deprivation. It is one thing if you want to go to sleep with your child at 7:00 pm and want to lay with them in their bed, but if you are doing it because you have to – because it’s the only way they will get to sleep – then it’s a problem.

Every new parent wants to rock their child and have them fall asleep on their chest; that is the most precious feeling in the world. It is an entirely different story when that HAS to be the norm, rather than it being a special occasion. Everyone in the household needs good, quality sleep. Period. End of story. And it’s not great if it only happens occasionally; it NEEDS to happen Every.Single.Night!

If you rock or nurse your child to sleep and they stay asleep through the night, then there is no need to change a thing. If your child is happy, and you are happy, I’m happy. A lot of moms say “my baby only wakes up, feeds and goes right back to sleep, we don’t have any sleep problems at all.” That may be okay for you, and it seems to be okay for the baby. But while she is feeding, her brain is working, telling the organs to start working. The stomach is working, the gut is working … the pancreas, liver and kidneys, all working to process that meal she has in the middle of the night. That means her body is not resting, her organs are not regenerating and healing themselves as they are required to do during sleep. And even though mothers say they are sleeping through their infants nursing all night, there is a part of your brain that is awake throughout the process because you need to know at all times where you are in relation to your baby and where your baby is in relation to you. You are not going into a deep slumber as you should to regenerate yourself. But again, if you are happy and your baby is happy, I’m happy. I am mainly advising that if you wish for your child to sleep through the night and it’s developmentally safe and appropriate, it is indeed possible.

Preventing the Sleep Deprived Child

To prevent a sleep deprived child, parents and caregivers should follow these guidelines:

  • DO put your child to sleep following her natural sleep cues
  • DO put her to sleep drowsy but awake
  • DO maintain consistency and sense of routine as children thrive and depend on this
  • DO what feels right for you and your family and DO trust your gut
  • DO NOT let your baby fall asleep in one place and then move her somewhere else
  • DO NOT turn on TV or engage her at night if she wakes up
  • DO NOT think that this is just a phase and they will eventually become good sleepers. Remember, good sleepers as infants make good sleepers as adults
  • EVERY CHILD CAN AND SHOULD SLEEP WELL

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The information on MommyMDGuides.com is not intended to replace the diagnosis, treatment, and services of a physician. Always consult your physician or child care expert if you have any questions concerning your family's health. For severe or life-threatening conditions, seek immediate medical attention.